Etsy sued after teething necklace purchased on site strangles young child | FOX 4 Kansas City WDAF-TV

SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. — A grieving California mother is taking the popular online retailer Etsy to court because she says a necklace she bought on the site strangled her son and killed him. Danielle Morin’s said she is sharing the story of what happened to her son Deacon to prevent this from happening to other parents. On December 10, 2016 someone found the little boy dead at his childcare center –he was strangled to death after the Baltic amber teething necklace he was wearing tightened around his neck and didn’t release. “Baby necklaces, if you use a baby necklace should have a releasing safety clasp so if there’s any pulling on it, it releases,” Morin’s attorney John Carpenter said. “This one that was purchased on Etsy.com. had a screw on clasp that could not be released. And so when baby Deacon was hung up on something, it didn’t release and caused him to suffocate.” Carpenter added that Etsy is legally liable for Deacon’s death-and filed a lawsuit against Etsy and the Lithuanian company that provided the necklace. The terms of use listed on Etsy’s website says, in part, “The items in our marketplaces are produced, listed, and sold directly by independent sellers, so Etsy ...

Jonathan Chancellor founded and is editor at large of Property Observer. His real estate reporting began

Jonathan Chancellor founded and is editor at large of Property Observer. His real estate reporting began at the Herald in Melbourne, and then for 25 years for the Sydney Morning Herald as its long-serving property editor.  Title Deeds was begun by Jonathan in 1987, becoming one of Australia’s longest published columns When brothers Ben and Rob Coorey created the technology to analyse the profitability of potential development sites within seconds, they had a choice…. read more Carbide Drill Bits, Carbide End Mill, Carbide Reamers – Millcraft,http://www.millcraftools.com/

Phone app effectively identifies potentially fatal heart attacks with near accuracy of medical ECG — ScienceDaily

Can your smart phone determine if you’re having the most serious — and deadly — form of heart attack? A new research study says it can — and may be a valuable tool to save lives. The international study, led by researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, found that a smartphone app to monitor heart activity and determine if someone is having an ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI), a heart attack in which the artery is completely blocked, has nearly the same accuracy as a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), which is used to diagnose heart attacks. Researchers say the findings are significant because the speed of treatment after a STEMI heart attack helps save lives. “The sooner you can get the artery open, the better the patient is going to do. We found this app may dramatically speed things up and save your life,” said J. Brent Muhlestein, MD, lead investigator of the study and cardiovascular researcher at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute. In the study, 204 patients with chest pain received both a standard 12-lead ECG and an ECG through the AliveCor app, which is administer...

In recent years, more and more baled silage has been made and this year is no

In recent years, more and more baled silage has been made and this year is no different. Favorable weather conditions this spring boosted grass growth early in the year which allowed farmers to mow and bale paddocks early. While the initial burst to make silage has been dampened by unfavorable weather conditions, farmers are – and will be – busy working the fields over the coming weeks. Whether it be a beef, dairy or sheep enterprise, farmers have improved their skills when it comes to managing out the most valuable and cheapest feed source – grass. This has led to surplus paddocks being closed and cut as high-quality bales. However, when it comes to storing these bales: What is the correct and safest way to do so? While farmers opinions will differ on this topic, both Teagasc and the Health and Safety Authority have the following guidelines. Firstly, if space allows, it is best to store all round bales one high on their flat ends. But, this may not always be practical – especially in recent years where yards may have been extended due to expansion. According to Teagasc, unwilted bales should be stored on the ground (on curved side or flat end) whereas successfully wilted bales...

Metal Stamping for Aerospace Components Register ico-supplier ico-white-paper-case-study ico-product ico-cad

Welcome to Thomas Insights — every day, we publish the latest news and analysis to keep our readers up to date on what’s happening in industry. Sign up here to get the day’s top stories delivered straight to your inbox. Metal stamped components find use in a full range of industries, and in safety-critical applications such as aerospace, those components must be manufactured to extremely tight tolerances and precision. To ensure that safety is never compromised, aircraft manufacturers must adhere to stringent quality standards. Not only do aerospace parts need to be durable, but they also are required to withstand fluctuations in pressure and temperatures created during the aircraft flight profile. Component weight is an important consideration to reduce fuel costs, which are directly impacted by the weight of the aircraft. When aircraft performance is crucial, as in military applications, lighter weight materials provide for greater maneuverability and versatility in mission profiles. To achieve lower weights, titanium is often selected, which is popular for its extreme temperature and corrosion resistance, as well as its high strength-to-weight ratio. Aluminum is another popul...

Through the history of internal combustion engines, there has been plenty of evolution, but few revolutions. Talk

Through the history of internal combustion engines, there has been plenty of evolution, but few revolutions. Talk of radically different designs always leads to a single name – Wankel. The Wankel rotary engine, most notably used in automobiles by Mazda, has been around since the late 1950’s. The Wankel rotary is an example of a design which makes sense on paper. However, practical problems cause it to underperform in the real world. Felix Wankel’s engine was conceived during a dream. In it, 17-year-old Felix was driving his car to a concert. When he arrived, he bragged to his friends that his car used a new type of engine – half turbine, half reciprocating. “It is my invention!” he told his friends. Upon waking up, Wankel became dedicated to building his engine. Though he never received a formal degree (or a driver’s license), Wankel was a gifted engineer. Young Wankel’s checkered history includes membership in several anti-semitic groups in the 1920’s. He was also involved with the founding of the Nazi party. His conflicting views on the direction of the party lead to his arrest in 1933. Eventually released through action of Hitler himself, Wankel joined the SS in 1940. The end...

International Yoga Day: 10 asanas that you should know about

On June 21, the fifth International Yoga Day will be celebrated across the world in a grand fashion, with yoga camps being organized and thousands of people partaking in the ages-old discipline.  This International Yoga Day, keep yourself aware of Asanas that will benefit your physical and mental health. Here are 10 asanas that you need to know about: Sukhasana or the easy pose is a meditative pose that calms and unites the body and mind. While opening the hips and lengthening the spine, the asana’s relative ease on the knees makes it easier than Siddhasana or Padmasana for people with physical difficulties. Some schools do not consider it to be as effective for prolonged meditation sessions because it is easy to slump forward while sitting in it. For meditation, it is important that the spine be straight and aligned with the head and neck. It helps reduce high blood pressure as it makes your body more balanced and your mind, free and joyful. Also known as the resting pose, child’s pose, or Shishuasana, is especially helpful to induce relaxation after various inversions and backbends during a yoga routine. The name Shishuasana is derived from Sanskrit and was brought about...

Ah, the ’90s—such a simpler time, when the only thing you had to worry about was

Ah, the ’90s—such a simpler time, when the only thing you had to worry about was getting home from Limited Too in time to catch Boy Meets World on TGIF (what a sad, sad, nostalgic sentence). Think you remember every little thing from your childhood? Then please, take a look at these ultra-popular ’90s hair tools to see how many you actually owned (or desperately wanted from the infomercials). Some have stood the test of time, and some—not so much. If regular rollers and pins were too much of a hassle, you used these tiny curl baskets called Spoolies—unless you had thick or long hair. Better in theory (as is the case with most ’90s hair tools), these rollers could realistically only fit two strands of hair, max. These foam bun formers have had a resurgence of popularity in recent years, but don’t forget the classic Hairdini of the ’90s. Back when the French twist was all the rage, this bendable foam wand was the ultimate hair hack. Basic ponytail? AS IF! Before there was online shopping, there was informercial shopping, and this TV ad made you never want to leave the house without your pony twisted and flipped. I can think of nothing more ’90s than a tie-dye plastic comb and matc...