Since the internal combustion engine was conceived, there’s always been a next wall to break through in technology. Concepts tend to arrive long before those breakthroughs, and engineers can only work with the technologies, tools, and money they have available at the time. A large part of engineering is simplifying or taking earlier attempts at a problem and making them more efficient. That’s lead to things like fuel injection replacing carburetors and digital engine management taking over from manually setting points in a distributor. It’s also how we get from the early giant 16 cylinder engines to the complicated and flawed 16-cylinder engines of the mid and late 20th century we’ll see in this list, and then to the 16-cylinder engines now powering Bugatti’s fastest hypercar. Or, from early turbocharging exploits by Oldsmobile to the modern compact turbocharged units we find now in both race cars and economy driven road cars. These are the complicated solutions to issues thrown up along the way, as well as a couple of examples of how complicated just adding cylinders can actually get. In the summer of 1952, Porsche was still a young automaker, but working hard to forge it...