Which worries you more: the risk of fire or the risk of chemical flame retardants in your kids’ pajamas? That’s the question I asked Cory Miller, a Washington mom of two who’s expecting a third. “I think both my husband and I have accepted that freaking out is an integral part of being mom and dad,” Miller said. But she does put some concerns over others. “The risk of chemical flame retardants concerns me more than the risk of flammability, mostly because there are so many other measures we can take to safeguard our family from fires, like having our smoke detectors checked regularly,” she said. Miller may not know it, but she’s applying 2017 logic to a 1970s regulation. Smoke detectors weren’t required in the early 1970s, but Congress decided that flame-resistant children’s pajamas should be. To comply, manufacturers started adding a flame-retardant chemical called Tris to kids’ sleepwear. Then, in the late 1970s, scientists discovered Tris was carcinogenic. It was like public opinion whiplash. The Consumer Product Safety Commission moved to ban Tris from pajamas and manufacturers ended up voluntarily removing it...