Screen and stencil printing technology has been used for a number of years for printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing and surface mount component assembly of PCBs. The green-colored solder mask, numbering and white component outlines found on many inexpensive PCBs is an epoxy material applied using a screen printing process. Prior to placing surface-mount components on a circuit board, solder paste is normally applied over the copper pads using a stencil printing method. These processes are similar to ancient silk-screening methods used for imaging patterns directly onto paper and textile products. Modern screens comprise of an interwoven mesh of thin stainless steel wire that supports a photo-imaged emulsion layer. Openings within the emulsion layer enable a variety of inks and epoxy pastes to be squeezed through and transferred onto a flat surface to reproduce the pattern imaged within the emulsion layer. Stencil printing is fairly similar in concept, except that the wire mesh is substituted with a thin metal or polymer foil through which a pattern of apertures have been cut, etched or plated. Wafer fabrication has long been ruled by concern for particulate control so as to...