Next Generation Cat Mini Excavators Designed for Optimum Value

Four new models in the Cat mini hydraulic excavator lineup, engineered and manufactured by Caterpillar, are designed to provide users the best performance, versatility, safety, operator convenience — and affordability — in the smallest possible packages for 1-to-2-ton class machines, according to the manufacturer. This customer-centered approach to engineering results in the new models incorporating new standard features, such as joystick steering (stick steer) and a tilt-up canopy or cab, as well as new options, including air conditioning and expandable undercarriages across the range. The new model range allows customers expanded choices for matching machine capabilities and machine features to the applications: 301.5 (1.5-ton class, standard tail swing, with canopy); 301.7 CR (1.7-ton class, compact radius, with canopy); 301.8 (1.8-ton class, standard tail swing, with either canopy or cab); 302 CR (2.0-ton class, compact radius, with either canopy or cab). Minimum operating weights (approximate) for the new models range from 3,500 to 4,500 lbs. (1 5,75 to 2,045 kg), with weights increasing to 3,900 to 4,900 lbs. (1,760 to 2,200 kg), depending on specific machine configuration...

Since the internal combustion engine was conceived, there’s always been a next wall to break through

Since the internal combustion engine was conceived, there’s always been a next wall to break through in technology. Concepts tend to arrive long before those breakthroughs, and engineers can only work with the technologies, tools, and money they have available at the time. A large part of engineering is simplifying or taking earlier attempts at a problem and making them more efficient. That’s lead to things like fuel injection replacing carburetors and digital engine management taking over from manually setting points in a distributor. It’s also how we get from the early giant 16 cylinder engines to the complicated and flawed 16-cylinder engines of the mid and late 20th century we’ll see in this list, and then to the 16-cylinder engines now powering Bugatti’s fastest hypercar. Or, from early turbocharging exploits by Oldsmobile to the modern compact turbocharged units we find now in both race cars and economy driven road cars. These are the complicated solutions to issues thrown up along the way, as well as a couple of examples of how complicated just adding cylinders can actually get. In the summer of 1952, Porsche was still a young automaker, but working hard to forge it...