The following are recent Luzerne County restaurant inspection reports from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. According the agency: “any inspection is a ‘snapshot’ of the day and time of the inspection. An inspection conducted on any given day may not be representative of the overall, long-term cleanliness of an establishment. Also, at the time of the inspection violations are recorded but are often corrected on site prior to the inspector leaving the establishment.” The information is taken from the inspection database at www.eatsafepa.com. Postal addresses used here are as listed on the state’s website, and may not correspond to the municipalities in which facilities are physically located.

El Rey Azteca, 681 Kidder St., Wilkes Barre, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Working container used for storing cleaner, taken from bulk supplies, was not marked with the common name of the chemical. Person in charge labeled container. Observed wet-wiping cloths in bar area, not being stored in sanitizer solution. Can opener blade, a food contact surface, was observed to have food residue and was not clean to sight and touch. Can opener was cleaned. Observed clean food equipment in kitchen area, stored wet in a manner that does not allow for draining and/or air drying (wet nesting).



Evans Roadhouse, 330 N. Hunter Hwy., Drums, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Clean spoons are displayed exposing food contact surfaces to hand contact by coffee service in dining room. Single-use plastic souffle cup is stored in plastic tub of ready-to-eat croutons in kitchen. The chlorine concentration in the sanitizing solution of the bar glass washer was 10 parts per million, rather than 50-100 ppm as required. Chemical changed, now 50 ppm residual chlorine. Food facility is reusing plastic food containers which are intended to be a single-service or single-use article. Floor tiles broken/missing pieces of surface material in food prep area.

Fisher’s Firehouse Grill, 14 W. Butler Drive, Drums, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Thermometers for ensuring proper temperatures of food are not available or readily accessible. Food facility does not have available sanitizer test strips or test kit to determine appropriate sanitizer concentration in low-temperature dish machine.

General Store, 154 Rte. 239, Shickshinny, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Raw eggs stored above milk in reach-in refrigeration unit. The eggs were moved to the lower shelf of the deli case during this inspection. Observed a buildup of brown residue on drain seals in all three bays of the three-compartment sink. The sinks were cleaned during this inspection. There is a buildup of static dust on the fan guards inside of the two-door Pepsi refrigeration unit.

Quick Stop, 411 W. 3rd St., Nescopeck, Dec. 6. Change-of-owner inspection; in compliance. Violation: No sign or poster posted at the hand-wash sink in the coffee bar area to remind food employees to wash their hands. A sign was posted during this inspection. Paper towel dispenser empty at the hand-wash sink in the employee restroom area. Paper towel was placed at hand-wash sink during this inspection.

Vesuvio Pizzeria/Donut Connection, 366 W. Butler Dr., Drums, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Food employees observed in food prep area, not wearing proper hair restraints, such as nets, hats, or beard covers. Observed deeply scored cutting boards not resurfaced or discarded as required. Top exterior surfaces of dish machine have buildup of grime.

Bethel Hill Mini Mart, 1099 Bethel Hill Road, Shickshinny, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance.

Butler Twp. Fire Co., 14 W. Butler Drive, Drums, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Three-basin bar sink has buildup of mineral deposits in basins.

Comfort Inn West Hazleton, 58 Route 93, West Hazleton, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; out of compliance. Violations: Refrigerated, ready-to-eat, time/temperature control for safety food prepared in the food facility and held for more than 24 hours, located in the refrigeration units, is not being date marked. Persons in charge are not monitoring establishment operation for compliance with food-code requirements. An original food-employee’s certificate is not posted in public view as required. No consumer advisory located on menu for animal-derived foods cooked to order. No thermometers visible in all in-use refrigeration units. No temperature-holding thermometer or temperature tapes, 160 degrees F, are available to monitor final-rinse plate surface temperature in high-temperature dishwasher. Drop chute/divider plate in ice machine has buildup of scum/mold-like residuals. Slicer has buildup of old, dried food residuals on food-contact surfaces. Slicer not used today. Interior surfaces of two microwave ovens at cook line have buildup of old, dried food residuals/grime on all surfaces. No hand towels available at food prep hand-wash sink. Basin for food prep hand-wash sink does not drain properly. Ceilings in food prep areas have buildup of grease film/static dust. Mop bucket filled with grey water and mop is stored by coolers in food prep area.

Dairy Queen Grill & Chill, 1245 Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre, Dec. 6. Follow-up inspection; in compliance.

Drums Fuel Stop Inc., 492 N. Hunter Highway, Route 309, Drums, Dec. 6. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Tongs at self-serve roller grill are not tethered.

Dunkin’ Donuts #349640, 1028 Wilkes Barre Blvd., Wilkes Barre, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed bags of ice stored directly on the floor in walk-in freezer, rather than 6 inches off the floor as required. Loose rubber door gaskets observed on the under-counter refrigeration units. Replacement gaskets have been ordered. Observed deeply scored cutting boards not resurfaced or discarded as required. Observed a buildup of dust in the vent above the ovens. Observed a buildup of food residues in and along the edges and in the vents on the bain marie. Observed a buildup of dust on the fan guards in two under-counter refrigeration units. Observed single-service, single-use articles stored in storage area directly on the floor, and not 6 inches above the floor. Articles were moved off the floor at time of inspection. Paper towel dispenser empty at the hand-wash sink in the prep area. Paper towels were provided.

First United Methodist Church, 6 E. Butler St., Shickshinny, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance.

Jersey Mike’s Subs, 11 Bear Creek Blvd., Wilkes Barre, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed small plastic containers with no handle used as scoops in bulk ingredients. Containers were removed. Observed interior edges and corners of bain marie units with an accumulation of food residue. Food employee observed towel drying food equipment after cleaning. Discussed proper handling of clean equipment. Observed single-service, single-use articles stored alongside hand-wash sink where they are subject to splash. Articles were removed from area.

Joe’s Choice, 544 Route 93, Sugarloaf, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Sinks have buildup of mineral deposits in basins. Cleaned during inspection.

Junie G’s, 12 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top, Dec. 7. Follow-up inspection; in compliance. Violation: Surface coating on wire shelving in walk-in cooler is deteriorated/rusting.

McDonald’s #05657, 251 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top, Dec. 7. Follow-up inspection; in compliance.

Pittston Lodge #1207, 425 Exeter Ave., West Pittston, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed an ambient temperature of 53 degrees F in the bain marie in the kitchen area. Unit will be serviced prior to storage of TCS foods. Meat slicer was observed to have food residue and was not clean to sight and touch. Meat slicer was cleaned. Metal shelving in the walk-in cooler was observed to have food residue and was not clean to sight and touch. Shelves were removed and discarded. Observed a buildup of syrup residue in the soda gun in the bar area. Gun was placed in cleaner during inspection.

Sirak’s Smokehouse, Retail Store, 3878 Main Road, Hunlock Creek, Dec. 7. Follow-up inspection; in compliance.

Abe’s Hot Dogs, 315 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Ceiling tile missing in rear prep area.

Boscov’s #009, 105 Laurel Mall, Hazle Township, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; out of compliance. Violations: Refrigerated, ready-to-eat, time/temperature control for safety food prepared in the food facility and held for more than 24 hours, located in the walk-in cooler, is not being date marked. Person(s) in charge are not monitoring establishment operation for compliance with food-code requirements. Food employee observed donning single-use gloves without a prior hand-wash. Food employees observed in food prep area not wearing proper hair restraints, such as nets, hats, or beard covers. Wiping cloths are not being kept in a sanitized solution when not in use. Cook was observed cracking fresh shell eggs, then handling ready-to-eat toast with the same gloves. Discussed proper glove use. Bag of onions stored on floor by rear kitchen three-basin sink. Approximately 3 pounds of mashed potatoes made the previous business day and stored in walk-in cooler are 53 degrees F. Product disposed due to improper cooling. Surface coating on wire racks in walk-in cooler is deteriorated. Top and exterior surfaces of dish machine and top interior surfaces of doors have buildup of old food residuals/grime. Unit cleaned during inspection. Exit ramp on clean side of dish machine has buildup of grime. Low temperature, chemical sanitizing dish machine is showing 0 ppm residual chlorine in final rinse after 5 cycles. All equipment and utensils to be subject to a proper mixed sanitizer on exit from machine until repaired.

Cavanaugh’s Grille, 163 N. Main St., Mountain Top, Dec. 7, Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Previously frozen, cryo-packed tuna and salmon are being thawed in unopened packages in walk-in cooler. No temperature holding thermometer or temperature tapes, 160 degrees F, are available to monitor final rinse plate surface temperature in high-temperature dish machine. Florescent light cover lens by dish machine is broken. Fan guards in all walk-in coolers have buildup of static dust.

Cold Case Beverage, 1712 Wyoming Ave., Exeter, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Door located in the back area of the food facility has a gap and does not protect against the entry of insects, rodents and other animals.

Dollar General Store #16818, 618 Blackman St., Wilkes-Barre, Dec. 7. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Observed 25-plus live beetles in bags of rice and on shelving under dried beans. All rice and beans were discarded and shelves will be cleaned and sanitized.

Booty’s Place, 1087 N. Church St., Hazle Township, Dec. 8. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Food employees observed in food prep area, not wearing proper hair restraints, such as nets, hats or beard covers.

Burger King #2955, 130 S. Wyoming Ave., Kingston, Dec. 8. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Broken missing wall tile just inside of the receiving door at rear of building and in need of repair. Floor/wall base moulding in the walk-in freezer area is cracked/broken and separated from the wall and is approximately ½ inch from wall with an accumulation of dirt and debris in the gaps. Floors inside both the walk-in cooler and walk-in freezer soiled with food debris and in need of cleaning. The floors of both units were cleaned during this inspection. Missing tile base moulding just outside of room with mop sink and in need of repair. Observed a large puddle of grease/oil on the floor in the corner across from the water heater where the cart used to transport grease/oil is located.

Ollie’s, 84 S. Wyoming Ave., Edwardsville, Dec. 8. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed containerized food stored directly on the floor in walk-in cooler area, rather than 6 inches off the floor as required. The container was elevated on shelf during this inspection. Loose/torn rubber door gaskets observed on the walk-in freezer. The owner stated that the repairman has a gasket on order and it is to be replaced when gasket arrives. Chlorine chemical sanitizer residual detected in the final sanitizer rinse cycle of the low-temperature sanitizing dishwasher was 0 ppm, and not 50-100 ppm as required. However the machine also has a water temperature booster; the water temperature during the rinse cycle was 160. New sanitizer was applied and residual was still 0 ppm. The owner placed call to have repairman come and evaluate why the chlorine residual is 0 ppm. Inspector to follow up. Observed a tan yeast-like residue on the ice dispensing trigger and ice chute of the fountain soda machine. The chute and trigger were cleaned and sanitized during this inspection. Underside of juice dispenser head (plate) a buildup of dried orange juice residue. The dispenser head plate was cleaned and sanitized during this inspection. Sink into which old coffee is poured was heavily stained. The sink was cleaned during this inspection.

Tattle Tales, 338 Buck Blvd., White Haven, Dec. 8. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Three-basin sink in kitchen has buildup of mineral deposits in basins. Two ceiling tiles missing in food prep area.

Cinnabon, 29 Wyoming Valley Mall, Suite 232, Wilkes Barre, Dec. 9. Opening inspection; in compliance.

Stations Grill, 251 Mundy St., Wilkes Barre, Dec. 9. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Facility does not test strips available to ensure rinse temperature of mechanical dishwashers reaches appropriate sanitizing temperature. Observed an accumulation of syrup residue on surface above dispensing nozzle on self-serve beverage machine. Receiving door located in the back area of the food facility has a gap and does not protect against the entry of insects, rodents and other animals.

The Susquehanna Tavern, 163-167 Susquehanna Ave., Exeter, Dec. 9. Follow-up inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed a buildup of old syrup in the soda gun nozzle at the bar. Observed a buildup of dust on the fan guards above the cooking area. Observed a buildup of food debris in the corners and cracks in the bain marie.

American Legion Post #815, 54 Chestnut St., Wilkes-Barre, Dec. 9. Follow-up inspection; in compliance.

Tolteca Express, 21A Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville, Dec. 12. Regular inspection; out of compliance. Violations: Working spray bottle near the three-compartment sink in the prep area, used for storing oven grille cleaner taken from bulk supplies, was not marked with the common name of the chemical. The bottle was labeled during this inspection. The person in charge does not have adequate knowledge of food safety in this food facility as evidenced by this non-compliant inspection. Two pans of meat in the walk-in freezer are stored open with no covering. The meat was covered during this inspection. An ice scoop was observed stored inside of the ice bin inside of the waitress/waiter station with handle in direct contact with the ice. The scoop was re-positioned during the inspection. The edge of the ice deflector plate inside of the ice machine, a food contact surface, was observed to have a buildup of pink slime. The deflector plate was cleaned and sanitized during this inspection. Employee restroom is not provided with a covered waste receptacle for sanitary napkins. Many baseboard tiles are missing from the stainless steel wall at the rear of the kitchen, between the dry storage room and the closet containing the water heater. The floor/wall juncture in this area is not covered and closed to 1/32 inch.

The following are recent Luzerne County restaurant inspection reports from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. According the agency: “any inspection is a ‘snapshot’ of the day and time of the inspection. An inspection conducted on […]

The following are recent Luzerne County restaurant inspection reports from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. According the agency: “any inspection is a ‘snapshot’ of the day and time of the inspection. An inspection conducted on […]

The following are recent Luzerne County restaurant inspection reports from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. According the agency: “any inspection is a ‘snapshot’ of the day and time of the inspection. An inspection conducted on […]

When 17 boys and 14 girls gathered for the first day of school at Wyoming Seminary, it was a time of horses and wagons, pot-bellied stoves, and stern rules against “scuffling” in the halls.

Early textbooks offered lessons in Latin and mathematics and English grammar, including when thou shouldst say “thy” versus “thine.”

As the present-day Wyoming Seminary community prepares to celebrate its 175th anniversary with a Homecoming Weekend, a gala dinner dance and a public concert, admissions director John Eidam said some things haven’t changed. The college preparatory school still wants to produce graduates who are prepared and determined to make the world a better place.

But it’s fascinating to look back at Wyoming Seminary’s history and gain insight into the lives of long-ago students, especially those who boarded.

Consider Royal Taft, who described in his 1864 journal how students kept warm in the winter, being “obliged to bring in coal and take out ashes. If we wanted hot water we had to heat it up on the stoves.”

Early students recalled getting up at 5 a.m. for an hour and a half of studying before breakfast. They also studied at night from 7 to 9:30, and had to be in bed by the 10 p.m. bell.

One young man casually wrote about the walks he took, some 20 miles from Kingston to visit his family in the vicinity of Tunkhannock, and on other occasions, about 16 miles round-trip to visit the young woman he was courting in the West Pittston area.

If you have a chance to visit Sem’s Kirby Center for Creative Arts on Sprague Avenue, perhaps for a free, 2 p.m. Sept. 22 concert scheduled to feature such alumni as opera artists Sara Casey and Jeff Martin and rapper Count Bass D, you’ll see treasured artifacts are on display, ranging from the desk of Sem’s long-time president Levi Sprague, who served 54 years in that position, to a vintage uniform worn by Betsy Condron when she was a Wyoming Seminary Lower School student.

The Lower School, which educates students up to eighth grade, has its roots in the Wilkes-Barre Academy, which was founded for boys in 1807, and in the Wilkes-Barre Institute, founded a few decades later for girls. They eventually merged to form the Wilkes-Barre Day School, which became part of Wyoming Seminary in 1951.

“I’m especially looking forward to seeing the former students and teachers who have memories of what was called the ‘tri-school’,” Lower School history teacher Clark Switzer said, anticipating the homecoming reunion.

Also looking forward to the anniversary is vice president of advancement John Shafer, who grew up with the campus surrounding his family home and has worked for the school more than 40 years.

“It doesn’t feel like work,” he said, explaining he gets to spend a lot of time talking to grateful grads who make his job easy. “About 65 to 70 percent of the money that comes in each year is from alumni,” he said.

“Every school says it’s like a family, but we have something that’s hard to describe,” he said. “We call it the Sem Way.”

Many deserving students receive financial aid to Wyoming Seminary, Shafer said, and they have opportunities to learn with classmates from around the world and prepare for a world that is becoming ever more global.

“It’s just as common for them to talk about going to work in Seoul or Hong Kong as it is to talk about going to work in New York,” he said.

Kevin P. Rea, who became Sem’s 12th president in 2015, summed up his experience this way: “What makes me smile is knowing that every day I can make a genuine difference in the world as a result of being at Sem, a school which welcomes students locally, nationally and globally and which transforms the lives of those students, producing inspired graduates with the courage and creativity to make the world an even more true, beautiful and good place to be in the long run.”

WILKES-BARRE — If you’re not in the business of cutting hair, you might never think about how all those shears and clippers stay sharp.

But for many area stylists, barbers and groomers, the answer is a regular visit from Sandor Bohm, owner of Get Sharp Mobile Sharpening Service.

“I like being my own boss,” said Bohm, a former chef whose Hungarian accent is still strong after 18 years in this country. “I love meeting new people.”

Bohm, who lives in Bloomsburg with his wife, Amy, and their sons Alex and Levi, frequently travels to businesses in Wilkes-Barre, Williamsport, and other towns in Northeastern and Central Pennsylvania, often following a schedule.

“Every 500 or 600 cuts, or every three months” is the frequency he recommends for many sharpening jobs, Bohm said as he set up his grinder and ceramic file in the Style Tee salon on South Empire Street in Wilkes-Barre on a recent Wednesday afternoon.

“They do dull very fast,” Style Tee co-owner Emil Feist said. “We do a lot of dry cutting, and a lot of deep point cutting that tends to dull the blade faster.”

“Some sharpeners take (the tools) away, and do it out in a truck,” Feist said. “I think it’s so cool to watch how it’s done.”

While Feist worked on a client’s hair, Bohm worked a few feet away, sharpening shears that weren’t in use.

“I started with knives, scissors and gardening tools at the Lewisburg Farmers Market. I practiced on my neighbors’ knives, everybody’s knives. Then a friend asked if I could do shears for hair cutting,” Feist said, explaining he expanded his knowledge by reading books and watching YouTube videos.

Before he sharpened a pair of shears, Bohm sprayed water onto a 1-ply piece of tissue paper and cut a slit into it — with some difficulty. That little test showed they were dull.

“Some of these shears are worth $500 or $600,” Bohm said, explaining why you would want to keep them well-maintained. “The most expensive I ever sharpened was $1,100.”

Bohm, who are recently sharpened tools at Rob and Nichole’s Barber Shop 901 in Wyoming, Posh Puppies Grooming Salon in Luzerne and Color Me Beautiful in Duryea in addition to Style Tee Salon in Wilkes-Barre, also occasionally sharpens a tool for an individual as opposed to a business.

“My mom still has her shears from when she attended West Side Vo-Tech 50 years ago. Vintage is a good word for them,” Genelle Sedon of Plains Township said. “My pop-pop used to take them somewhere (to be sharpened), but they weren’t sharpened since before he passed in 2013.”

Searching the internet, Sedon found Get Sharp and was delighted that Bohm agreed to sharpen her mom’s shears. “He did a great job,” she said. “Just in time for Nonni to give my kids back-to-school haircuts.”

That didn’t mean it was overrun with Great Danes, beagles or mutts; just that it was an ideal place to try out your act.

“If you put meat in front of the dog and the dog won’t eat it, nobody else should eat it. So if a play or musical event didn’t work in Scranton, it probably wouldn’t work in New York or anywhere else,” said Ro Hume, a new American citizen — she was naturalized in February after moving here from her native Australia — who recently wrote the narrative for a REV Theatre Co. production called “Scranton Vaudeville.”

You can take in the free performance 2 p.m. Sunday at the United Neighborhood Centers’ Oppenheim Center for the Arts, 1004 Jackson St., in West Scranton, where you can admire the talents of some professional performers as well as local young people and older adults who have been working with REV Theatre’s artistic directors Rosemary Hay and Rudy Caporaso.

The production will showcase some Scranton theatrical history as well as songs from hearken back to vaudeville’s heyday.

“Toot, toot, Tootsie, good-bye. Toot, toot, Tootsie, don’t cry. The choo-choo train that takes me away from you, no words can tell how sad it makes me …”

You’re probably not old enough to have heard the songs in the 1920s, when they first came out, but you might have heard them on Mitch Miller records. That was Caporaso’s introduction, when he was a kid.

Enthusiastic about the catchy tunes, he recalled, “I would force my sister to put on a show with me, and my parents were mortified when we performed for their friends. I’d bribe them to watch with cheese and crackers … I was about 8.”

Earlier this week United Neighborhood Centers regulars Betty Griffiths, 82, and Cindy DeSarno, 66, practiced harmonizing on a “You Are My Sunshine” duet.

They’re looking forward to singing in the show, as is Chuck Weber, 85, who remembers seeing live performances of “magicians, singers, dancers and comedians” at places like the Capitol Theater when he was growing up in Scranton.

“There were 10 legitimate (vaudeville) houses in Scranton,” Caporaso said. “People like Buster Keaton, Ray Bolger and Fanny Brice came here.”

Will Rogers, John Phillip Sousa, Buffalo Bill Cody and Lillie Langtry also came to Northeastern Pennsylvania, Hume said, noting she based her narrative on history she found in Nancy McDonald’s book “If You Can Play Scranton: A Theatrical History.”

‘You knew where you stood in Scranton,” Caporaso said. “If they liked you, you were embraced. If they didn’t like you, you’d be booed off the stage. ‘Get the hook’ was a real thing.”

Mackenzie Snyder is celebrating her 10th birthday today, July 6. She is the daughter of Matt Snyder of Swoyersville and Jennifer Gourley of Nanticoke. She is the granddaughter of Ron and Theresa Snyder of Swoyersville and great-granddaughter of Rita Snyder of Swoyersville and the late Victor Snyder as well as the late Mary Burgess of Ocala, Fla, and the late Roy Schwartz of St Louis, Mo.

“Together, we’ve had 100 years of feeding people,” Mitch Kornfeld, co-owner of the Woodlands, said Monday afternoon as he handed a large facsimile of a $1,000 check to Cornelia “Corny” Romanowski, president of Meals on Wheels of Wyoming Valley.

The Meals on Wheels program, which operates out of the kitchen of the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston, is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year — as is the Woodlands — so it was especially meaningful that the Woodlands helped Meals on Wheels kick off a $50,000 fund-raising campaign that, organizers hope, will ensure the wheels keep turning to bring food to the homebound.

“We bring more than food,” said RoseMarie Panzitta, who has served the organization as a driver since 1972. “Sometimes we’re the only person (the clients) see for the whole day, or the whole week.”

“Anytime the Woodlands can get involved with the community,” Kornfeld said, “we like to pay it forward.”

Unlike the Meals on Wheels programs in some other community, Meals on Wheels of Wyoming Valley receives no government grants or subsidies. Each client pays $6 daily for two meals — a hot entree, starch, vegetable and bread that serves as the main meal, plus a cold lunch of a sandwich, fruit and dessert.

Food prices have risen and Meals on Wheels loses more than a dollar on each of the 80 to 85 meals its volunteer drivers and runners deliver daily, but the board doesn’t want to raise the prices the clients pay.

Hence the need for the fund drive, which is asking local businesses to contribute $1,000 toward the 50th anniversary goal and also appealing to members of the community, who have been making donations in the $10 to $100 range.

The community appeal will continue through the summer and fall, spokeswoman Judy Daly said, and will culminate in a 50th anniversary reception, to be held at the Woodlands on Oct. 23.

The reception will honor the Rev. Anita Ambrose, who served as a volunteer on the first day of delivery, Jan. 27, 1969, and it will honor Rose Marie Panzitta and Ruth Gavenus, who have been volunteers for 47 and 48 years, respectively.

The program has three employees — a coordinator and two cooks “who do a wonderful job,” Romanowski said. More than 50 volunteer drivers use their own vehicles to deliver the meals — a total of 19,935 in 2018 — to Ashley, Dallas, Edwardsville, Forty Fort, Hanover Township, Hudson, Kingston, Larksville, Lee Park, Luzerne, Miners Mills, Nanticoke, Parsons, Plains, Plymouth, Shavertown, Swoyersville, West Wyoming to the Midway Shopping Center, Wilkes-Barre and Wilkes-Barre Township.

While there is no age or income requirement, the vast majority of the meals are delivered to senior citizens. Meals on Wheels of Wyoming Valley serves the homebound, those with chronic conditions or those recovering from an accident, an illness, hospitalization or rehabilitation.

Donations from individuals, families or in memory of someone may be sent to Meals on Wheels of Wyoming Valley, 190 South Sprague Ave., Kingston PA. 18704. For more information, contact coordinator Amy Morris at 570-288-1023.

And, if you want to help the Woodlands celebrate its 50th anniversary, circle June 21 on your calendar. The gala is set for 6 to 8 p.m. that day.

No, it wasn’t the day her Hanover Area Marching Band played through “pouring rain, hail, snow and freezing rain” and still won a Tournament of Bands Championship at Montage Mountain.

Rather, it was four years of musical excellence, brought about by hard work, creativity and practice sessions that sometimes lasted for 12 hours.

“It was a perfect storm of kids who wanted to do it and directors who had an amazing vision,” said Hyder, who served as drum major for the award-winning band. “We were all there at the right time.”

Hyder is one of many Hanover Area Marching Band alums — joined by former band parents and directors — who plan to celebrate the school’s “Broadway on the Football Field” glory years of ‘93 to ‘96 during a 25th-anniversary reunion set for 4 to 9 p.m. June 8 at King’s Restaurant, Route 309, Mountain Top.

“The band circuit was ridiculously competitive in those days, and we were the cream of the crop — not to be cocky,” she said. “I remember practicing like crazy.”

It wasn’t just the kids who worked hard at music and choreography. Their parents worked hard at providing anything else they might need for a routine.

”Ed (Teleky, who arranged the music ), wanted a train horn, and we got one from a locomotive in a junkyard,” one-time Band Boosters president Ron Shandorf, of Plains Township, recalled. “Ed said he wanted hand bells, so we borrowed them from a church and promised to polish them before we returned them.”

When visual director Bobby Jones asked for props that looked like cottages and a temple to serve as a backdrop for a “Fiddler on the Roof” routine, the parents built it. When Jones asked for a portable bridge so the musicians could march over it and through its tunnel while performing “Rhapsody in Blue,” they built that, too.

“I shot for the moon; I didn’t know any better,” Jones said in a telephone interview. “And they took pride in building those things. The kids and parents were the epitome of hard-working community spirit.”

Pasty sales, craft sales and rent-a-kid for yard work services helped raise funds for plywood, lumber and metal, Shandorf said. “We would have two fund-raisers a month.”

If a band member was having trouble with a routine, Jones remembered, “I would take them out of study hall for 45 minutes” of individual coaching.

And, as a group, Hyder said, the band spent hours at afterschool practices, weekend practices, and band camp.

The results? From 1993 to 1996, Hanover Area took first-place honors three times at the Tournament of Bands Atlantic Coast Championships and second-place once.

Their award-winning routines, set to “West Side Story,” “Rhapsody in Blue,” “A Chorus Line” and “Fiddler on the Roof,” included color guard, dancers and musicians who seemed to dance rather than march. Even the drum major’s outfit fit the production numbers, with the young conductor dressed as a village peasant for “Fiddler on the Roof” or a 1920s-era flapper for “Rhapsody in Blue.”

Jones, who was studying at Luzerne County Community College while coaching at Hanover Area, remembers the band’s meteoric rise. “They were ranked 43rd,” he said. “Then in 1992 when I wrote the show, they went from 43 to 17,” he said. “Then in 1993 they won. It was huge for the community.”

Barely out of high school himself at the time — he’d been part of the color guard at Lake-Lehman — Jones said he was grateful to Teleky and to band director Joe Baranoski. “I was growing up myself, and they were terrific mentors.”

“I was super fortunate,” drum major Hyder seconded the sentiment. “Ed Teleky trained me and he was the drum major for the U.S. Air Force Band. I was trained by the best of the best.”

After their time at Hanover Area, Teleky and Jones were both inducted into the World Drum Corps Hall of Fame in 2016.

Reservations for the reunion will close June 1. They can be made by messaging Amber Hyder through her Facebook page or contacting Shandorf at Ron @Shandorf.com or 610-462-8476. Admission is $16 for adults, $8 for ages 6 to 12 and free for children younger than 6.

WILKES-BARRE — All you have to do is mention “Wilkes-Barre” and “wallet” in the same sentence, and Steve Martin remembers what he really likes about this place.

“It was a miracle, Martie,” the famous comedian/actor/writer and banjo player Steve Martin, 73, told his buddy, the famous comedian/actor/writer and singer Martin Short, 68, during a recent conference-call interview.

Recalling how he had been in town for a 2013 bluegrass performance with the Steep Canyon Rangers, Martin said he had unfolded the fold-up bicycle he used to bring on his tour bus, went out for a bike ride before the concert and lost his wallet — but not for long.

That’s how they banter with each other, these two amigos who have been friends ever since they appeared as two-thirds of the title in the 1986 film “The Three Amigos.”

Their 2019 “Now You See Them, Soon You Won’t” tour will bring the comic pair to the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza at 8 p.m. Feb. 15 for conversation and a variety of musical sketches that will include the talents of the Grammy Award-winning Steep Canyon Rangers and jazz pianist Jeff Babko.

You can expect Martin to play some banjo, despite the fact that he’s been wearing a thumb brace to cope with the effects of “a little arthritis.”

“I talked to Earl Scruggs, the greatest banjo player who ever lived and asked him, ‘Earl, how do you play with arthritis?’ He said, ‘I just play through it,’ “Martin recalled, hinting he will do the same.

“I sing at one point,” Short said modestly, “but it’s the Steep Canyon Rangers and Steve you want to hear. They’re brilliant. I’m just the clown element.”

Actually, both gentlemen have a history of clowning around, whether they were hosting NBC’s “Saturday Night Live,” saving a town in “The Three Amigos,” or appearing together in 1991’s “Father of the Bride,” with Martin as the bride’s overwhelmed dad and Short as the flamboyant wedding planner.

Short’s other credits include a Tony Award for his role in the revival of “Little Me,” an Outer Critics Circle Award for his role in the musical version of Neil Simon’s “The Goodbye Girl” and a Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award from the government of his native Canada.

His 2014 memoir “I Must Say: My Life as a Humble Comedy Legend” made the New York Times Best Sellers List.

Martin began his comedy career writing for the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and by the mid-1970s was doing stand-up on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. His movies include “The Jerk” (1979); “Planes, Trains & Automobiles” (1987); “Roxanne” (1989), “L.A. Story” (1991) and “Bowfinger” (1999).

“Love Has Come For You,” a bluegrass song he composed with songwriter Edie Brickell, won a Grammy for “Best American Roots Song” in 2014. He has also written a novel, “An Object of Beauty,” the play “Picasso at the Lapin Agile,” a novella called “Shopgirl” and his memoir, “Born Standing Up.”

When asked to describe each other, Martin said of Short, “Martie is everyone’s favorite person. The worst part of it is, without thinking he’s a genius or anything, he knows it. It’s just a fact.”

Short said of Martin: “The first thing that comes to mind is he’s very, very kind and sweet, has an endless fascination with things and curiosity.”

WILKES-BARRE —Since she’s going to be dancing in the Great Russian Nutcracker tonight, 14-year-old Grace Nicolai, of Dallas, doesn’t know how much of the performance she’ll actually get to see. But she’s hoping for a special treat.

“If I could watch something I’d watch that (Dove of Peace),” Nicolai said earlier this week, referring to Moscow Ballet’s signature duet, a pas de deux in which two dancers, each wearing one wing, come together to form a dove. “I think it would be amazing.”

The Dove of Peace, Russian snow maidens, colorful nesting dolls, hand-painted sets and a girl named Masha who enters a Land of Peace and Harmony with her Nutcracker Prince will all be part of the enchantment the Moscow Ballet is set to bring to the F.M. Kirby Center for a performance that begins at 7 tonight. Dec. 14.

But that’s only part of the equation. Dancing with the Russian professionals will be about 70 children and teens from around the region who auditioned in September with a visiting representative of the Moscow Ballet, Alisa Bolotnikova, at the Harris Centre for the Performing Arts in Luzerne.

“The girls are super excited,” said dance instructor Elisabeth Harris, who has been working with the young dancers ever since. “You should see their faces. They’re just beaming.”

Young cast members will perform as party children, mice, snowflakes, snow maidens and snow sprites during Act I. Then in Act II the student dancers will take part in Spanish, Chinese, Russian and French variations.

Julia Macey, 15, of Dallas, said she’s delighted she was chosen to take part in the Russian variation.

“That’s a crowd pleaser,” she said. “It’s very peppy and the song — everybody recognizes it because it’s used in all the Christmas movies. It’s very intricate and fast. Audiences just go wild for that.”

Dancers in the Moscow Ballet, who last came to Wilkes-Barre in 2015, are role models, 16-year-old Mya Corcoran, of Wilkes-Barre, said.

It’s interesting to watch the different styles the variations reflect, 14-year-old Isabella Locke, of Lehman, noted, describing the Chinese number as “kind of happy and smiling” and the Russian number as “energetic and it looks like a lot of fun.”

She’s in the Spanish variation, which involves a certain flirtatious attitude, partly expressed with a hand-held fan. “I like acting and being sassy is fun for me,” she said.

“There are so many amazing things about this,” Macey said. “I get to share this opportunity with some of my really, really close friends. I’ll be getting to see them in their costumes. I’m so excited. I remember the last time the Russians came. It felt so professional.”

Lauren Grace Reich celebrated her fifth birthday Oct. 30. She is the daughter of Wanda and Michael Reich, of Drums. Grandparents are Joe and Maryann Reich, of Hazle Township, and William and Beverly Bacher, of Drums.

That seemed to be the attitude of a little goat at the Bloomsburg Fair as it nibbled the bright green award tied to its pen.

Maybe the critter would have shown more respect to a first-place blue ribbon, two city slickers surmised as we wandered through the Bloomsburg Fair earlier this week, but the green, sixth-place version seemed eminently munchable.

Speaking of eating, that’s a major activity at the fair, for people as well as animals. We did our share, sampling potato pancakes and maple milkshakes and then circling back to a permanent building — you can’t miss it; it has a facsimile of a big baked potato on its roof — to choose from the menu the folks from the Black Creek United Methodist Church of Sugarloaf were serving.

“Enjoy every ounce of that pulled pork,” the cashier advised us, adding she had personally pulled more than 200 pounds herself.

Had that been an exhausting task? Not at all, she said, explaining the meat was so tender after eight hours or so of slow roasting, it practically fell off the bones.

The church’s cozy building, where they’ll continue to serve food through Saturday, was a welcome shelter from Tuesday’s rain, as were the many other structures where you could find everything from antique farm equipment to high school students’ up-to-the-minute STEM projects, and from livestock to arts and crafts.

Much of the artwork was eye-catching, from the needle-craft image of the original Star Trek crew to the photo of two squirrels peeking from a knothole to a rendering of a tiny striped kitten seeing a tiger as it gazed at its reflection.

But maybe the best thing about the fair is its overall salute to agriculture, farmers and farm life, which can be really educational to us city dwellers. If you live in Wilkes-Barre and maybe have some tomatoes or lettuce in a backyard garden, it can be eye-opening to look at gigantic pumpkins and samples of hay and realize people from as close as Danville and Nescopeck brought this rustic fare to be judged at the fair.

It’s heart-warming and reassuring, somehow, to see the fruit and vegetables that people have picked and preserved and the nuts they’ve gathered and to think — with gratitude — about where food comes from.

As one sign set up next to a scarecrow described the life of a farmer: “His equipment is worth more than his house. His animals eat breakfast before he does. He bases his day on acres rather than hours (and) He can fix almost anything with baler twine and duct tape.”

You still have four more days to enjoy the 163rd annual Bloomsburg Fair, which takes place through Saturday at 620 West Third Street in Bloomsburg. Admission is $8 at the gate, from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily, for ages 12 and older; free for those younger than 12 every day. Students ages ages 13 to 18 get free entry on Friday.

The bride-to-be is the daughter of Debbie DiSabatino, of Mountain Top, and Joe DiSabatino, of Stillwater. She is a graduate of Bloomsburg University with a degree in interpersonal communications.

The groom-to-be is the son of Aileen and Fred J .DeLucca III, of Swoyersville. He is a graduate of Luzerne County Community College with a degree in computer science.

The following are recent Luzerne County restaurant inspection reports from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. According the agency: “any inspection is a ‘snapshot’ of the day and time of the inspection. An inspection conducted on any given day may not be representative of the overall, long-term cleanliness of an establishment. Also, at the time of the inspection violations are recorded but are often corrected on site prior to the inspector leaving the establishment.” The information is taken from the inspection database at www.eatsafepa.com. Postal addresses used here are as listed on the state’s website, and may not correspond to the municipalities in which facilities are physically located.

Food Express Convenience Store, 804 E. Fifth St., Berwick, April 27. Regular inspection; in compliance.

Long John Silvers #31497, 40 S. Wyoming Ave., Rte 11, Edwardsville, April 27. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: The food facility does not have the original certificate for the certified food employee posted in public view. No sign or poster posted at the hand-wash sink in the restrooms used by employees remind food employees to wash their hands. Signs were posted during this inspection.

Johnny Rockets at Mohegan Sun, 1280 Rte. 315, Wilkes-Barre, April 28. Follow-up inspection; in compliance.

McDonald’s #120556, 500 Union and Buckingham, Luzerne, April 28. Regular inspection; in compliance.

Mohegan Sun Pocono Food Trailer MFF4, 1280 Rte. 315, Wilkes Barre, April 28. Opening inspection; in compliance.

No. 1 Chinese Restaurant, 8B Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville, April 28. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations; Observed an excessive accumulation of ice on the shelves inside the reach-in freezer in the prep area, and does not allow for the removing or cleaning of shelves. Loose rubber door gaskets observed on the reach-in freezer. The screen door located at the rear of the kitchen area of the food facility has a gap with visible light at the floor/door junction and does not protect against the entry of insects, rodents, and other animals. The screen door located at the rear of the kitchen has loose/cracked wood on the lower portion with visible light that does not protect against the entry of insects, rodents, and other animals. Observed distressed merchandise (can of oyster sauce) with dented hermetic seal in the dry storage area, not clearly segregated from other food, utensils and equipment as required. The can was removed and marked for return.

Northeast Concession at Mohegan Sun, 1280 Rte. 315, Wilkes-Barre, April 28. Follow-up inspection; in compliance. Violation: Observed shelves rusting and peeling in multiple refrigeration units. Facility has plans to replace all shelving.

Pearl at Mohegan Sun, 1280 Rte. 315, Wilkes-Barre, April 28. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed plastic containers with no handles being used as scoops and stored in food ingredients. Containers were removed. Observed a buildup of dust on the fan guard in the refrigeration unit in he sushi prep area. Observed a buildup of residue on the bottom of the beverage cooler in the bar area.

Pizzano’s Pizza, 733 Main St., Avoca, April 28. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: The water temperature of the wash compartment of the manual ware-washing equipment was 103 degrees F, less than 110 degrees F, as required. Person in charge to contact building owner to adjust hot water settings. Observed a buildup of food residue on shelves in the 2 refrigeration units. Shelves cleaned during inspection. Observed a buildup of black residue on the gaskets on the chest freezers. Person in charge cleaned areas. Observed a buildup of dust on the fan guard in the bain marie. Observed a buildup of old food residue on the non-food contact areas of the deli slicer. Observed a heavy buildup of grease on side of the fryer and on the hoods over the cooking area.

Timbers Buffet at Mohegan Sun, 1280 Rte. 315, Wilkes-Barre, April 28. Complaint inspection; in compliance.

BJ’s Pub and Eatery, 620 Hillside D., Harleigh, May 1. Follow-up inspection; in compliance. Violation: Thermometers for ensuring proper temperatures of food are not available or readily accessible.

Cook’s Pharmacy and The Sandwich Shoppe at Cook’s, 1909 Memorial Hwy., Shavertown, May 1. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Paper towel dispenser empty at the hand-wash sink in the prep area. Paper towels were placed at the hand-wash sink during this inspection.

Denny’s #8804, 83 Rte. 93, Hazleton, May 1. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Chemical spray bottle is stored on shelf above food zones in kitchen. Spray stored properly during inspection. Food employees observed in dish wash area, not wearing proper hair restraints, such as nets, hats. Floor plate seam sealant in microwaves is deteriorated/not smooth. Not easily cleanable. Floors around and behind equipment in food prep have buildup of spilled food residuals and grime.

Polish American Citizen’s Club, 111 Elm St., Dupont, May 1. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Observed a buildup of dust on the hoods above the cooking area. Hoods are scheduled to be replaced.

Treat Pizza & Ice Cream, Memorial Highway, Dallas, May 1. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Food facility has an original certificate posted, but the location is not conspicuous for public viewing. The certificate was posted in a conspicuous location during this inspection. The post can opener blade, a food contact surface, was observed to have a dried black residue and was not clean to sight and touch. The post can opener was cleaned and sanitized during this inspection.

Turkey Hill Minit Market #152, 455 Main St., Kingston, May 1. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: The 3-bay manual ware-wash sink observed to have a buildup of white residue on the drain board and outside surfaces. The inside surfaces of all three bays had a tan/brown residue. The sink was cleaned and sanitized during this inspection. The backside of the ice dispensing triggers (non-food contact surface) of the soda machine with a buildup of pink slime and black mold-like residue. The triggers were cleaned and sanitized during this inspection. Observed a buildup of static dust on the fan guards inside of the walk-in cooler.

Dida’s Incredible Edibles, 219 Broad St., Nescopeck, May 2. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Observed containerized food stored directly on the floor in walk-in freezer, rather than 6 inches off of the floor as required The containers were elevated during this inspection.

Dida’s Incredible Edibles MFF 3 Mobile 2, 219 Broad St., Nescopeck, May 2. Regular inspection; in compliance.

Swizzle Stick, 434 Main St., Edwardsville, May 2. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: The interior ceiling (foam insulation) of the walk-in keg cooler located in the basement is sagging due to water damage from ice machine that leaked water down onto cooler. Owner has contacted a repairman to repair.

Nucleus Raw Foods LLC, 63 Main St., Luzerne, May 3. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Observed dried food residue on the door handles, and door tracks of the sliding door stainless refrigeration unit in the prep area. Observed dried food residue on the handles of the reach-in refrigeration and freezer unit in the kitchen area. Observed dried food residue on the sealing rim surface of the chest freezer in the service counter area. Observed dried spillage on the door shelves in the refrigerator portion of the stainless steel reach in refrigeration/freezer unit in rear kitchen.

Subway, 19 N. Main St., Shickshinny, May 3. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed flaking of the inside surface of white plastic bowl used for chopping food items causing potential for food contamination. Observed deep scoring on the inside surface of 3 white plastic bowls, which is not no longer smooth, easily cleanable. No test strips available to verify proper concentration of sanitizer in 3-compartment sink.

CFM Beer Store, 101 Main St., Luzerne, May 4. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation; Pre-packaged hoagies and pizza in grab-and-go refrigeration unit is not labeled properly with the name of product, ingredient statement, net weight, distributed by statement and/or nutritional facts. A placard was placed during this inspection. Pre-packaged hoagies and pizza located in grab-and-go refrigeration unit is not labeled to clearly indicate any “Big 8” allergen ingredients and/or the allergen warning statement. A placard was placed during this inspection.

Convenient Food Mart #3014, 101 Main St., Luzerne, May 4. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation; Buildup of black grime on the fan guard inside of the 3-door True refrigeration unit.

Food Express Pikes Creek, 2399 Rte. 118, Hunlock Creek, May 4. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Raw eggs stored above ready-to-eat foods inside of the deli case. The eggs were moved to the bottom shelf during this inspection. Facility is not reheating pre-packaged pre-cooked breakfast sandwiches to 135 degrees F for hot-hold prior to placing in the hot-hold unit. The person in charge removed the hot-hold from service and stated that they would only sell the sandwiches to the customer to take home and reheat or that he would allow the customer to reheat the sandwiches themselves by using a table top oven that is available.

Jonathan’s, 31 Lakeside Dr., Harveys Lake, May 4. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: There is a buildup of a white mineral deposit like residue on the inside surfaces of all bays and drainboard of the 3-bay sink used to service the deck area.The sink was cleaned and sanitized during this inspection. All inside surfaces of the microwave oven, a food contact surface, located in the kitchen was observed to have food residue and was not clean to sight and touch. The microwave was cleaned and sanitized during this inspection. No sign or poster posted at the hand-wash sink in the upstairs mens restroom and the downstairs ladies restroom which are used by employees to remind food employees to wash their hands. Signs were posted during this inspection.

Wendy’s #0985001, 551 Susquehanna Blvd., West Hazleton, May 4. Complaint inspection; in compliance.

Napoli Pizzaria Restaurant, 26 S Main St., Pittston, May 5. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed the paint peeling on the on area around the shaft on the mixer. Observed the plastic coating on the shelves in one refrigeration unit beginning to deteriorate. Observed a buildup of dust on the fan guard on the pizza prep bain marie. Observed a buildup of old food residue around the hinges on the bain marie.

Pizza Perfect, 16 Carverton Rd., Trucksville, May 5, Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: An area of ceiling plaster approximately 4” x 6” is missing form the ceiling in the area between the front and rear kitchen area. Person in charge stated that is is slated to be repaired.

Subway #58952, HC1 17D Rte. 940, White Haven, May 5, Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Residual day date adhesive and labels are observed on stacked, cleaned food pans. Trash receptacles are overflowing in womens and mens restrooms. Cleaned during inspection.

Tomato Bar, 7 Tomato Fest Dr., Pittston, May 5. Follow-up inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed residue on the underside of shelves in the walk-in cooler. Employee restroom in the basement does not have a self-closing door. Observed a buildup of black residue on the wall and debris on the floor behind mechanical dishwasher.

Cafe Italia, 1723 River Rd., Pittston, May 5, Follow-up inspection; in compliance. Violation; Observed multiple metal shelves that are rusting and no longer smooth and easily cleanable.

Callahan’s Cafe & Coffee House, 69 S. Main St., Pittston, May 5. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed raw eggs stored above ready-to-eat foods in the bain marie. Eggs were moved. Observed a buildup of food debris along the back edges of both bain maries.

Huntsville Golf Club, 1334 Market St., Lehman, May 5. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: 1/2 of a 1 gallon container of whole milk was observed in the server station refrigerator offered for sale past expired sell by date of 4/30/17. Product was voluntarily disposed of during this inspection. Three 1 gallon containers of whole milk were observed in the walk-in cooler offered for sale past expired sell by date of 04/30/16. Product was voluntarily disposed of during this inspection. Three and 1/2 gallon containers of skim milk were observed in the walk-in cooler offered for sale past the expired sell by date of 5/3/17 Product was voluntarily discarded during this inspection. Clean dish racks observed stored on the floor in dish washing area area. The racks were elevated during this inspection.

Just From Scratch Catering LLC, 191 Golf Course Rd., Hunlock Creek, May 5. Regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Food facility is using an approved non-public water system, but does not have current laboratory testing results for water potability. The facility does not have Nitrate/Nitraite results that are within the past year. They have taken sample to the Kirby Health center and are awaiting the results. The facility will email the results to this inspector upon receipt.

WILKES-BARRE TWP. — A man received medical attention after police say he was attacked by an unknown assailant outside of the Macy’s department store at the Wyoming Valley Mall on Monday night. Police were dispatched […]

WILKES-BARRE — The city Health Department on Monday issued an advisory that a rabid cat was captured in the North End. Wilkes-Barre Animal Enforcement Officer Adam Olver said the person who had the cat had […]

WILKES-BARRE — As of Monday morning, things will be a little bit different around the Luzerne County Courthouse, with Michael T. Vough being sworn in as president judge during a ceremony under the courthouse’s rotunda. […]

WILKES-BARRE — Hours after Jay Fernandez helped two passengers and directed others to pull the driver from a vehicle that erupted in flames after a crash, he was back at work preparing for the opening […]

WILKES-BARRE — City police on Monday charged a man from Moosic who allegedly orchestrated a plan to rob a drug dealer that resulted in three people getting shot earlier this year. Miles Jermaine Singleton, 21, […]

Unless more users sign up, Luzerne County 911 may consider discontinuing the Smart911 program after 2020, department Executive Director Fred Rosencrans said. Initiated here in September 2011, the program allows residents to provide information about […]

WILKES-BARRE — You may have seen a popular new trend of igloo-shaped structures allowing for outdoor dining in the chilly winter months. If you were interested in staying warm at an outdoor party this winter, […]

New Year’s Eve is one of the most popular holidays in the world. As we usher out the old and ring in the new, it is a time of reflection and celebration. Many people use […]

WILKES-BARRE — Dan Carey, owner of Carey’s Avenue Barber Shop for the last five years, knows the secret to holiday success. It’s beer. That’s why the barber shop’s annual holiday craft beer exchange is such […]

After 62 years of service in the Wyoming Valley, the electric trolley era came to an end when the last streetcar made its final run Oct. 15, 1950. Although no ceremony was held by the […]

Luzerne County is advertising the drug and alcohol department head position that had been vacated by the Nov. 22 resignation of Steven Ross, according to the human resources section at www.luzernecounty.org. Ross had worked in […]

The eight-day ‘festival of lights’ began Dec. 22 and ends at nightfall tonight. Lazer Gajer from Bais Menachem Youth Development Program in Mount Cobb lights the seventh candle on the menorah on Public Square in […]

WASHINGTON — Ten months ago, I gave readers of this column an early preview of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. Keep an eye on the new faces, I sagely advised: Sens. Kamala Harris […]

The beginning of a new year is a fine time to take stock of things, especially your overall well-being. It’s true that taking care of yourself doesn’t need to coincide with a grand event, like […]

Last week we ran an editorial about the rise of anti-Semitism in this country and overseas, lamenting that a sense of fear had descended over Jewish people all over the world as they began the […]

WILKES-BARRE — From the largest expansion of voting rights in 80 years to establishing a state-based marketplace to reduce health care costs to a sweeping executive order targeting gun violence, Pennsylvania “continued its comeback” in […]

PLYMOUTH — At Midnight Mass, a young man arrived with his family and I noticed he was wearing two red socks. Very festive, I thought, so I stopped him and told him it was good […]

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was 27 years of age in 1933 when he was speaking on nationwide radio. Suddenly he is struck from the airwaves when he says, “Any leader who seeks to be an idol will […]

In my nearly 40-year career, I have made too many mistakes to count. Some have been small and others large, but everyone came with good intentions. It is easy not to get things completely correct […]

As promised, ending the year with nothing but diamonds in hopes to set an upbeat tone for the new year. Diamonds to Wyoming Area School District for winning the state class 3A football championship, and […]

A presidential impeachment trial in the Senate is one man’s worst nightmare. That man isn’t President Donald Trump, however. He’ll take it in stride. It’s Chief Justice John Roberts, who will have to preside. Roberts […]

The sanitation officials whose infrastructure gets clogged up by an ever-growing deluge of “flushable wipes” isn’t trying to punish or cheat you as part of some grand conspiracy related to the “rain tax.” On Thursday, […]

WASHINGTON — In their search for a presidential nominee, Democrats have argued about all manner of things. They’ve debated “Medicare for All” and a “Green New Deal.” They’ve weighed a wealth tax and free college […]

The deep political divide in this country has been manifest in Congress in recent weeks, peaking with the vote Dec. 18 in the House of Representatives to impeach President Donald Trump. The nation’s partisan division […]

Automatic Foam Net Making Machine Suppliers for Sale

Eggs Tray Machine, Eggs Tray Making Machine, Egg Carton Making Machine - FuChang,https://www.fcmachines.com/